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—CONSOLIDATE ACCOUNTS AND SIMPLIFY YOUR FINANCIAL LIFE

Posted by Admin Posted on Sept 23 2018

accounts consolidate

 

If you’ve accumulated many bank, investment and other financial accounts over the years, you might consider consolidating some of them. Having multiple accounts requires you to spend more time tracking and reconciling financial activities and can make it harder to keep a handle on how much you have and whether your money is being invested advantageously.

Start by identifying the accounts that offer you the best combination of excellent customer service, convenience, lower fees and higher returns. Hold on to these and consider closing the rest, keeping in mind the bank account amounts you’ll be consolidating. The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation generally insures $250,000 per depositor, per insured bank. So if consolidation means that your balance might exceed that amount, it’s better to keep multiple accounts. You should also keep accounts with different beneficiaries separate.

When closing accounts, make sure you stop automatic payments or deposits and destroy checks and cards associated with them. To prevent any future disputes, obtain letters from the financial institutions stating that your accounts have been closed. Closing an account generally takes several weeks.

If you have any questions regarding accounting, domestic taxation, international taxation, IRS representation, U.S. tax implications of Real Estate  transactions or financial statements, please give us a call at 305-274-5811.

Source: Thomson Reuters

The information provided on the LBCPA Blog is a community service for general information purposes only, and should not be used as a substitute for consultation with professional advisors who specialize in the topics covered. Please refer to your advisors for specific advice on these subjects. The information is not intended to be used, and it cannot be used, for the purposes of avoiding U.S. Federal and/or State tax laws or the tax laws of any foreign jurisdiction.

These blogs contain general information only and Lord Breakspeare Callaghan LLC or any of the other companies or firms presenting information are not providing accounting, business, financial, investment, legal, tax, or other professional advice or services. Lord Breakspeare Callaghan LLC or any of the other companies or firms contributing with articles shall not be responsible for any loss sustained by any person who relies on this information.

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